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Happy Christmas and a Peaceful New Year from TEFS



If you have time please look back over the TEFS offerings of 2018. Hopefully you will find them informative. It has been a stormy year that will proceed into 2019 unabated. To help track things, you can download a free TEFS Calendar for your office or study.



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A plea for some Christmas goodwill.

When celebrating Christmas with family, friends and colleagues, please spare a thought for the staff that serve you. Many will be students with considerable financial challenges. Not all students will be home with family that is the experience of most of us. Some will have no family to fall back on or visit at Christmas. Some will be away from far flung homes. Some will be living with unsupportive families or unable to return home. Yet, in my experience, they rarely complain and soldier on as best they can.

At a function in England recently, I discovered that all of the staff serving were students and that the floor manager was also a student preparing for examinations. I am about to go to a Christmas function in Edinburgh this afternoon and expect similar. Please take time to notice them in the background and be considerate if you are one of the ‘fortunate ones’. They may have just completed semester examinations whilst working extra shifts in the run up to Christmas. They may have examinations in January but have little time to revise until after New Year.


In the meantime.....







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