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Building a new bridge for students or sigh! - same old bridge?


Building a new bridge for students
or sigh! - same old bridge?


The BBC have reported:

"The launch of a "major review" of university tuition fees is expected in the next few weeks - despite speculation that it was going to disappear into the political black hole of a minority government consumed by Brexit."


Will tuition fees be scrapped or saved by university review? BBC News 1st December 2017


On 20th November, on the lead up to the budget, TEFS reported:

The most likely outcome is that a major review will be announced. This is likely to be reported in time for the Conservative election manifesto in the New Year as another election looms. See: The Budget and Student Fees: Give My Head Peace!

It came as a surprise that it did not get a mention in the budget.
Despite the glaring omission, it seems the problem will not go away.
Neither will the students burdened with debt.

Now the BBC are predicting a "major review".  The Government should have noted this in its budget  if it is to be believed to be  honest with the electorate. We wait to see what emerges.


The comments on this site reflect the views of the person posting the comments and do not necessarily reflect the views of  TEFS

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